Re: Nichols Fingers FBI Agent Directing McVeigh in OKC Bombing By Name, Newspaper reported name of Potts before court sealed documents/ The Trentadue Files
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Re: Nichols Fingers FBI Agent Directing McVeigh in OKC Bombing By Name, Newspaper reported name of Potts before court sealed documents/ The Trentadue Files         

Group: talk.politics.misc · Group Profile
Author: Seperatist9
Date: Feb 22, 2007 19:31

On Feb 22, 10:21 am, carmen.su...@hotmail.com wrote:
> New OKC Revelations Spotlight FBI Involvement In Bombing
> Nichols' claim that McVeigh had government handlers supported by huge
> weight of known evidence
>
> Prison Planet | February 22, 2007
> Paul Joseph Watson & Alex Jones
>
> New claims by Oklahoma City Bombing conspirator Terry Nichols that
> Timothy McVeigh was being steered by a high-level FBI official
>
> are supported by a plethora of evidence that proves McVeigh did not
> act alone and that authorities had prior warnings and were
>
> complicit in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah building.
>
> The Salt Lake Tribune reported yesterday,
>
> Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols says a high-ranking
> FBI official "apparently" was directing Timothy McVeigh in the
>
> plot to blow up a government building and might have changed the
> original target of the attack, according to a new affidavit filed in
> U.S.
>
> District Court in Utah.
>
> The official and other conspirators are being protected by the federal
> government "in a cover-up to escape its responsibility for the loss
>
> of life in Oklahoma," Nichols claims in a Feb. 9 affidavit.
>
> Documents that supposedly help back up his allegations have been
> sealed to protect information in them, such as Social Security
>
> numbers and dates of birth.
>
> The U.S. Attorney's Office in Utah had no comment on the allegations.
> The FBI and Justice Department in Washington, D.C., also
>
> declined comment.
>
> The affidavit was filed in a lawsuit brought by attorney Jesse
> Trentadue, whose brother Kenneth was tortured and beaten to death in
> an
>
> Oklahoma City federal prison in 1995. Authorities claimed Trentadue
> had committed suicide but he was being held in a suicide proof
>
> cell at the time and autopsy photoshttp://www.apfn.org/apfn/OKC_Trentadue.htm
> of his body showed he had been shocked with a
>
> stun gun, bruised, burned, sliced and then hung.
>
> Jesse Trentadue has amassed evidence that his brother was mistaken for
> one of Timothy McVeigh's alleged bombing accomplices
>
> and in attempting to get him to talk Federal agents went too far and
> then tried to instigate a cover-up of the murder.
>
> Just like 9/11, the official story of the Oklahoma City Bombing, that
> McVeigh alone carried out the attack using a fertilizer truck bomb,
>
> is contradicted by a plethora of eyewitness account as well as
> physical and circumstantial evidence.
>
> [VIDEO]
>
> - In early April 1995 a Ryder truck identical to the one used in the
> bombing was filmed by a pilot
>
> http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/RANCHO/POLITICS/OK/TRUCK/truck.html
> during an overflight of of an area near Camp
>
> Gruber-Braggs, Oklahoma. A June 17th, 1997 Washington Post article
> authenticates the photos as being exactly what they appear to
>
> be, photos of a Ryder truck in a clandestine base at Camp Gruber-
> Braggs. Why were the military in possession of a Ryder truck
>
> housed in a remote clandestine army base days before the Alfred P.
> Murrah bombing?
>
> - In a 1993 letter to his sister, McVeigh claimed that he was
> approached by military intelligence and had joined an "elite squad of
>
> government paid assassins." McVeigh often contradicted himself and
> changed his story on a whim to fit in with the latest government
>
> version of events. Is the Camp Grafton footage evidence of McVeigh's
> enrollment in such a clandestine program?
>
> The Internet leader in activist media - Prison Planet.tv . Thousands
> of special reports, videos, MP3's, interviews, conferences,
>
> speeches, events, documentary films, books and more - all for just 15
> cents a day! Click here to subscribe!
>
> - Multiple reports of Arabs at the scene assisting McVeigh were
> ignored and surveillance tapes were withheld under national security.
>
> The likely reason for this was the fact that Bush senior and Clinton
> were responsible for bringing in
>
> http://www.prisonplanet.com/news_alert_082593_iraq.htmlnearly 1,000
> Iraqi soldiers captured by U.S. forces during the 1991 Persian
>
> Gulf War, some of whom were involved in the bombing.
>
> - The FBI claimed McVeigh scouted the Alfred P. Murrah building weeks
> before the bombing and yet on the morning of the attack he
>
> stopped at a local gas station to ask directions, lending credibility
> to the new claims that he was being controlled by other
>
> conspirators and that the target of the bombing had been changed.
>
> [VIDEO]
>
> - Original reports of two explosions and several failed devices being
> defused by bomb squads were buried by the establishment as the
>
> official explanation that McVeigh acted alone was pushed. Scientific
> analysis
>
> http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/RANCHO/POLITICS/OK/PARTIN/okm.htm
> conducted by General Benton K. Partin revealed core
>
> columns were blown out from within the building and the extensive
> damage to the Alfred P. Murrah building was completely
>
> inconsistent with the explanation of a single and relatively weak
> fertilizer truck bomb.
>
> - Many eyewitnesses reported that bomb squads in full reaction gear
> were seen around the building immediately before the blast.
>
> Police officer Terence Yeakeyhttp://www.apfn.org/APFN/yeakey.htm,
> who helped save dozens of victims, was one such witness.
>
> Yeakey compiled extensive files on his observations but was later
> found with his throat and wrists slashed having also been shot in the
>
> head after he had told friends he was being followed by authorities.
>
> - Several individuals received prior warning that the bombing was
> about to take place. Bruce Shaw, who rushed to the Murrah building
>
> to find his wife who was employed there with the Federal Credit Union,
> testified that an ATF agent told him that ATF staff had been
>
> warned on their pagers not to come to work that day.
>
> - The aftermath of the bombing led to the passage of the Omnibus Crime
> Bill and the demonization of the 'Patriot Movement', which
>
> was spreading like wildfire as opposition to federal government abuse
> grew following the events at Ruby Ridge and Waco. The
>
> consequences of the Oklahoma City Bombing effectively dismantled the
> Patriot Movement before the turn of the century.
>
> In December, we reported on a videohttp://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/december2006/181206mcveighvideo.htm
> that shows
>
> McVeigh at a U.S. military base that specialized in explosives and
> demolition training over a year after he supposedly left the army.
>
> The tape, released by film producer Bill Bean, was the subject of a
> Hustler Magazine feature story.
>
> Appearing last night on George Noory's Coast to Coast broadcast,
> America's biggest late night radio show, Alex Jones said he
>
> expected to talk to Jesse Trentadue imminently and it was further
> suggested by Noory that he and Jones should travel to Nichols'
>
> prison to interview him in person.
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/okc_bombing_new_revelations_spotl...
>
> ==
>
> The Trentadue Files
> New documents offer details of the FBI's secret OKC investigation
>
> INTELWIRE.com | February 21, 2007
> J.M. Berger
> Click here for the full documents and an index of their contents.http://intelwire.egoplex.com/trentadueindex.html#docindex
>
> UPDATES
>
> 9/21/2006:
>
> The full collection of Trentadue documents can be found herehttp://intelfiles.egoplex.com/2006-12-05-trentadue-2-docs.pdf. This
>
> 100-page PDF contains unredacted versions of some of the documents
> below as well as previously unreleased documents.
>
> 12/5/2006:
>
> The FBI has released two addtional documents, which can be viewed by
> clicking here .
>
> Original documents obtained by INTELWIRE cast additional light on
> individuals and groups mentioned in the Trentadue documents.
>
> Click herehttp://intelwire.egoplex.com/2006_08_27_exclusives.htmlfor
> documents related to Andreas Strassmeier and other OKC
>
> figures involved in a Texas militia group. Click herehttp://intelfiles.egoplex.com/#guthriefor documents related to Aryan
> Republican
>
> Army and Richard Guthrie.
>
> Several newly revealed FBI documents provide the most dramatic
> evidence to date that the Oklahoma City bombing was carried out by
>
> a conspiracy involving more people than Timothy McVeigh and Terry
> Nichols.
>
> Attorney Jesse Trentadue has disclosed more than 50 pages of FBI
> internal documents, which are at the center of a court battle over
>
> the FBI's obligation to disclose information about the Oklahoma City
> bombing investigation. All currently available documents are now
>
> available to journalists and the public on this site.
>
> The documents have been credibly authenticated during the course of
> Trentadue's lawsuit. Some of the documents were provided to
>
> Trentadue in redacted form by an undisclosed source. The lawsuit aims,
> in part, to obtain the unredacted versions of this documents.
>
> Trentadue, a Salt Lake City attorney, became involved in the lawsuit
> after the death of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, in federal
>
> custody on Aug. 21, 1995. Kenneth Trentadue's death was initially
> declared a suicide by prison officials, but the family discovered
>
> signs of numerous injuries when preparing him for burial. The family
> was awarded more than $1 million after winning a wrongful death
>
> suit against the government.
>
> Jesse Trentadue's lawsuit over the FBI's disclosure stems from a
> belief that his brother was killed because of his resemblance to
>
> Richard Lee Guthrie, a white supremacist and bank robber who has been
> credibly linked to the Oklahoma City bombing by numerous
>
> reports, including those from the Associated Press, J.D. Cash of the
> McCurtain Gazette and In Bad Company
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect?link_code=ur2&tag=nabobsne...
>
> n.com/gp/product/1555534929?v=glance%%26n=283155%%26n=507846%%26s=books
> %%26v=glance , a 2001 book by criminology
>
> professor Mark S. Hamm.
>
> Guthrie was later apprehended by authorities. Just days before he was
> scheduled to testify against one of his accomplices in the bank
>
> robbery gang, Guthrie was found dead of a purported suicide in his
> cell. His alleged means of suicide was hanging, the same cause of
>
> death originally cited by prison officials for Kenneth Trentadue.
>
> Trentadue has presented the documents linked below as part of an
> effort under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to force the FBI
>
> to disclose its internal files on the Oklahoma City bombing, including
> unredacted versions of some of the cited documents. The FBI is
>
> notoriously unwilling to provide information about the Oklahoma City
> bombing in particular, and is also known for being generally
>
> unresponsive to FOIA requests. Thousands of pages of documents
> relevant to the OKC investigation were also improperly withheld by
>
> the Justice Department until after the conviction of Timothy McVeigh,
> whose attorneys had requested the documents in discovery.
>
> In the course of Trentadue's lawsuit, the FBI has denied the existence
> of some documents (including those linked below), but the
>
> agency was forced to withdraw that claim after Trentadue presented
> copies of the documents in court as proof of their existence.
>
> Trentadue has not disclosed how he obtained the documents, but their
> authenticity is no longer in dispute.
>
> The FBI has subsequently attempted other legal strategies to avoid
> disclosure, in full or in part, and the case is ongoing. For more
>
> information on Jesse Trentadue and the lawsuit, click on the following
> links to recent news articles:
>
> * Attorney Offers Document On OKC Warninghttp://kutv.com/topstories/local_story_315122423.html
>
> * Documents May Prompt Congressional Probehttp://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47447
>
> * Jesse Trentadue's Long Battle For Proofhttp://www.thenewamerican.com/artman/publish/article_2589.shtml
>
> * Terror, Lies and Memoshttp://www.thenewamerican.com/artman/publish/article_2590.shtml
>
> * Testimony: ATF warned before OKC ( Alt. link )http://www.mccurtain.com/headline.shtmlhttp://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp...
>
> * FBI Files Sealed Documents in OKC Suithttp://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=46983
>
> The documents are indexed in detail below, with links to facsimiles
> which were provided to INTELWIRE by Jesse Trentadue. The
>
> documents reveal that the FBI investigated links between the Oklahoma
> City bombing and white supremacists (both individuals and
>
> groups). The documents also flatly contradict various claims made by
> the FBI in the years since the bombing.
>
> The Trentadue Documents
>
> The following documents can be viewed by clicking the links below, and
> they can also be navigated in order from the first page
>
> http://intelwire.egoplex.com/1trentadue.html.
>
> With all of these documents, the important point to remember is that
> the FBI has fought against disclosing them, despite various legal
>
> obligations to do so, including as part of discovery in the federal
> trials of Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols. The author of this Web
>
> site does not necessarily stipulate that every lead reported within
> the documents is provably true, but many of them are highly credible
>
> and all of them are worthy of further journalistic investigation.
>
> The documents were filed as exhibits in Jesse Trentadue's FOIA lawsuit
> against the FBI and have been credibly authenticated during
>
> the course of those proceedings. They were provided to INTELWIRE by
> Trentadue. The dates provided usually reflect the date the
>
> document was created, but in some cases may reflect the date the
> document was received and filed by FBI headquarters.
>
> Some documents contain signficant redactions. The documents were
> provided to Trentadue in redacted form by an undisclosed
>
> source. One document has additional redactions added by INTELWIRE out
> of privacy concerns. The specific redaction is noted in the
>
> index below, and an unredacted version is available for mainstream
> journalists interested in pursuing this story.
>
> FBI TELETYPE, AUGUST 1995http://intelwire.egoplex.com/1trentadue.html
>
> * White supremacists planned to bomb U.S. targets
> * Unnamed suspect may have assisted McVeigh
>
> This redacted document is connected to the OKBOMB investigation
> (the FBI's code name for the Oklahoma City bombing). The
>
> teletype discusses a report from an undisclosed individual regarding
> Elohim City, a white separatist compound in Vian, OK. Court
>
> records confirm that McVeigh telephoned the complex shortly before the
> OKC bombing, and numerous reports have suggested links
>
> between McVeigh and Nichols, Elohim City and the Aryan Republican
> Army, a bank robbery gang whose members were white
>
> separatists who stated that the proceeds of their robberies would be
> used to fund terrorist attacks on the U.S. government.
>
> On page twohttp://intelwire.egoplex.com/2trentadue.htmlof the
> document, an unidentified informant (name redacted) is quoted as
>
> saying that unidentified individuals at Elohim City have explosive
> devices which they intend to use on various targets around the U.S.
>
> Meetings on such plans are described, but the names of the
> participants have been redacted.
>
> On page three of the document, the writer states that "[redacted
> name] also indicated that [redacted name] may have assisted
>
> McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing."
>
> FBI TELETYPE, JANUARY 1996http://intelwire.egoplex.com/4trentadue.html
>
> * McVeigh phone call to Elohim City, 4/17/1995
> * Suspect cited for relationship to McVeigh
> * 4/17 call was to seek additional conspirators
>
> This document dealing with BOMBROB, the bank robbery
> investigation involving Richard Guthrie, has been significantly
> redacted.
>
> However, it stateshttp://intelwire.egoplex.com/6trentadue.htmlthat
> "Information has been received through the Southern Poverty Law
>
> Center that one [name redacted], aka [name redacted], [redacted]
> telephone call from Timothy McVeigh, on or about 4/17/1995, two
>
> days prior to the OKBOMB attack, when [name redacted], per a source at
> the SPLC, was in the white supremacist compound at
>
> [redacted], OK. [name redacted] allegedly has a lengthy relationship
> with Timothy McVeigh, one of the two indicted OKBOMB
>
> defendants. The source of the SPLC advised that [name redacted] is
> currently residing with [name redacted] in [redacted], N.C., and
>
> plans to leave the U.S. via Mexico in the near future."
>
> "Prior OKBOMB investigation determined that McVeigh had placed a
> telephone call to Elohim City on 4/5/1995, a day that he was
>
> believed to have been attempting to recruit a second conspirator to
> assist in the OKBOMB attack (emphasis added by INTELWIRE)."
>
> FBI TELETYPE, AUGUST 1996http://intelwire.egoplex.com/8trentadue.html
>
> * McVeigh phone calls detailed
> * BOMBROB suspects summoned by phone from Phila.
>
> On the second pagehttp://intelwire.egoplex.com/9trentadue.html
> of this teletype from FBI headquarters to the Philadelphia office
>
> of the FBI (involved in the BOMBROB investigation), the following
> passage appears:
>
> "Information has been developed that [names redacted] were at
> the home of [name redacted] Elohim City, Oklahoma, on 4/5/1995
>
> when OKBOMB subject, Timothy McVeigh, placed a telephone call from
> [redacted] residence to [redacted] residence in Philadelphia
>
> division. BOMBOB subjects [names redacted] left [redacted] residence
> on 4/16/1995 en route to Pittsburgh (sic), Kansas, where they
>
> joined [name redacted] and Guthrie."
>
> Some of the Aryan Republican Army bank robbery suspects lived in
> Philadelphia. The ARA maintained a safe house in Pittsburg,
>
> Kansas.
>
> SUMMARY OF INFORMANT INFORMATION, 1/16/1996http://intelwire.egoplex.com/13trentadue.html
>
> * SPLC informant information discussed
> * McVeigh meeting with unnamed suspect in 1993
>
> As has been reported elsewhere, the Southern Poverty Law Center
> (an independent organization that monitors hate group activity
>
> in the U.S.) maintained an informant in Elohim City. The reports of
> this informant have become the center of much ensuing controversy
>
> regarding the OKC investigation. This OKBOMB document summarizes
> information obtained through this avenue.
>
> The document states: "With regard to [redacted] wherein Timothy
> McVeigh met [redacted] being in November 1993, the
>
> information was actually that it was approximately 18 months before
> the bombing." The rest of the report appears to represent
>
> speculation on the part of the informant, but certain sections are so
> heavily redacted that it is impossible to know for sure.
>
> FBI TELETYPE, 1/11/96http://intelwire.egoplex.com/17trentadue.html
>
> * Redacted information on suspect links
>
> This OKBOMB case teletype also discusses information obtained
> from the SPLC. The document is OKBOMB related and refers
>
> to relationships between individuals whose names have been redacted.
>
> FBI TELETYPE, 1/20/96http://intelwire.egoplex.com/18trentadue.html
>
> * Heavily redacted
> * McVeigh 4/17 call to suspect identified
> * Suspect reported to plan flight from country
>
> This heavily redacted OKBOMB document contains extensive
> information on individuals whose names have been excised.
>
> According to the teletype , the FBI in Oklahoma "has received
> information [redacted name] may be an associate of Timothy McVeigh.
>
> (According to the SPLC informant,) "McVeigh attempted to
> telephonically contact [redacted] on or about April 17, 1995, while
> [name
>
> redacted] was residing in Elohim City."
>
> Massive portions of the page that follows are redacted but
> appear to contain reports from numerous confidential witnesses (CW)
>
> relating to the above claim. On the subsequent page , an informant
> reports "[redacted passage] because things were 'too hot out
>
> there.' CW understood that [redacted] was referring to the bombing of
> the Oklahoma City federal building."
>
> INFORMANT SUMMARY, 12/21/1995http://intelwire.egoplex.com/24trentadue.html
>
> * Relationships to McVeigh discussed
> * McVeigh 4/17 call again discussed
> * Elohim City reaction to McVeigh arrest
>
> Another OKBOMB case document referencing information from the
> SPLC informant. According to the document, "In November
>
> 1993, [redacted] met Timothy McVeigh [long passage redacted] is
> described as a white male, DOB (date of birth) [redacted] POB
>
> (place of birth) [redacted]. He is a [redacted] who [redacted] with
> help from [redacted] somewhere in [redacted] and [redacted].
>
> Allegedly, McVeigh and [redacted] became associates because of their
> common background in [redacted].
>
> "[redacted] was [redacted] at Elohim City, Oklahoma. On 4/17/95,
> McVeigh called Elohim City and spoke with a female who
>
> answered the phone. He asked to speak to [redacted].
>
> "Sources have told [redacted] that [redacted] Elohim City
> anywhere from two days before the Oklahoma City bombing to two
>
> weeks before the bombing. [redacted] latest information is that
> [redacted] of Elohim City, saw McVeigh being led out of the
> courthouse
>
> on television and at that time, [redacted] was told to [redacted]."
>
> Virtually all of the remaining document is redacted, except for
> a notation that the information may be valuable to the FBI's legat
>
> (legal attache) in London, who was investigating the background of an
> individual whose name has been redacted.
>
> FBI TELETYPE, FBI HQ TO LEGAT BONN, 1/26/1996http://intelwire.egoplex.com/26trentadue.html
>
> * Andreas Strassmeir likely subject of document
> * Documents seized by OK police, contents redacted
>
> Although this document has been heavily redacted, one can
> reasonably speculate that it deals with German national Andreas
>
> Strassmeir, an Elohim City resident who has been linked to the BOMBROB
> suspects and also to the Oklahoma City investigation.
>
> Strassmeir was the son of a high-ranking German government official,
> according to British newspaper The Guardian
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/mcveigh/story/0,7369,488262,00.html.
> Strassmeir reportedly met McVeigh at a gun show in 1993.
>
> The teletype says that [name redacted] may be an associate of
> Timothy McVeigh," and reiterates several phrases from the
>
> teletype of 1/20/96http://intelwire.egoplex.com/18trentadue.html,
> suggesting both documents may primarily concern Strassmeir (who
>
> reportedly fled the country in 1996).
>
> Even more importantly in terms of furthering this investigation,
> the teletype states that it provided to the FBI several documents
>
> received from confidential sources regarding Elohim City. "Among these
> documents were documents [redacted] relating to [redacted]
>
> Some documents have the heading [redacted]. One document appears to be
> a [redacted] dated [redacted]. One document [redacted]
>
> is entitled [redacted]. This document certifies that [redacted]. The
> course included instruction in [redacted]."
>
> The remainder of the document is heavily redacted, often
> inexplicably so, such as the removal of apparent references to Terry
>
> Nichols and Michael Fortier, known subjects in the investigation whose
> identities hardly need to be concealed.
>
> TESTIMONY OF CAROL HOWE, APRIL 24, 1997http://intelwire.egoplex.com/39trentadue.html
>
> * Informant gave ATF prior warning of attacks
> * Evidence of ATF warnings intentionally suppressed
>
> The following sections of court transcripts record a sealed
> hearing concerning ATF informant Carol Howe, a resident of Elohim
> City
>
> at the time of the bombing. This material was suppressed, apparently
> with the explicit purpose of excluding it from consideration in the
>
> trial of Timothy McVeigh.
>
> The transcript indicates that Ms. Howe had previously been an
> informant for the ATF and was re-activated after the Oklahoma City
>
> bombing. Ms. Howe's ATF handler was questioned during the hearing. The
> explosive portion of the transcript ( click here ) states that
>
> Ms. Howe informed the ATF -- prior to the Oklahoma City bombing --
> that Andy Strassmeir had threatened to bomb U.S. federal
>
> buildings, and that Howe accompanied Elohim City residents on a trip
> to Oklahoma City of unclear intent.
>
> In the presiding judge's own words, "We have got evidence that
> the ATF took a trip with somebody who said that buildings were
>
> going to be blown up in Oklahoma City before it was blown up, or
> something of that nature."
>
> FBI FD-302 INFORMANT REPORT ON DAVID HOLLAWAY, 2/25/1997http://intelwire.egoplex.com/50trentadue.html
>
> * Informant reports OKC suspicions regarding alleged white
> supremacist
>
> This report details an informant's conversation with Dave
> Hollaway, a Special Forces veteran with alleged ties to white
> supremacist
>
> groups. The information in this report is unsubstantiated and should
> not be construed as evidence of guilt, but the document is clearly
>
> relevant to the OKBOMB investigation and is included here as such.
>
> According to the document, Hollaway was associated with CAUSE, a
> white supremacist foundation and had acted as an
>
> intermediary on occasion between the federal government and militant
> white supremacist groups. According to the informant, Hollaway
>
> presented himself as a member of such groups.
> The document states that Hollaway claimed to have spoken with
> Timothy McVeigh two days before the Oklahoma City bombing.
>
> Hollaway critiqued the placement of the truck bomb used in the attack
> and provided details on the construction of such bombs,
>
> according to the document.
>
> FD-302, FBI INTERRGOGATION OF DAVID HOLLAWAY, 8/13/1996http://intelwire.egoplex.com/52trentadue.html
>
> * FBI inteviews alleged white supremacist about alleged McVeigh
> call
>
> In this record of an FBI interview with Hollaway, Hollaway
> appears to confirm the general points raised in the preceding
> document,
>
> including his affiliation with the CAUSE foundation. Hollaway said he
> received a call on April 18, 1995, from an unidentified caller which
>
> had threatening overtones in the context of the following day's
> events. He claimed that he informed the FBI of the call via a tip
> hotline
>
> on April 20, 1995, and that FBI agents subsequently followed up with
> him by phone.
>
> INTELWIRE has removed some personally identifying information
> about Hollaway from the original form due to privacy
>
> considerations. Mainstream media outlets seeking more information may
> contact INTELWIRE for the unredacted page.
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/okc_bombing_trentadue_files_index...
>
> ==
>
> In the matter of Kenneth Michael Trentadue (Part 1/5)
>
> J.D. Cash / McCurtain Dailey Gazette | April 7, 2004
>
> Editor's note: Scheduled for Denver, Colo., today, attorneys for the
> family of the late Kenneth Michael Trentadue will renew their
>
> long-running campaign for what they see as truth and justice, this
> time in front of a federal appeals court, arguing that a loved one
> was
>
> tortured and murdered by members of the Department of Justice in
> Oklahoma City.
>
> Since the death of Kenneth Trentadue on Aug. 21, 1995, the government
> has spent millions on legal expenses, trying to escape
>
> responsibility for the suspicious death of an inmate left in the sole
> custody of federal government employees. The family is trying to
>
> collect the $1.1 million a judge awarded them for severe emotional
> distress he said was caused by federal officials, but it represents
>
> only a small portion of the damages they may someday receive if the
> 10th Circuit Court of Appeals orders a new trial in the case.
>
> Recently, Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue asked this newspaper
> to review a substantial body of evidence he has collected
>
> concerning his brother's mysterious and gruesome death - a death that
> the government claims was a suicide.
>
> Both the death and its aftermath were bizarre. So heavy were the
> pressures following Trentadue's strange death that the investigating
>
> Oklahoma medical examiner, terrified of retaliation from the Justice
> Department, wrote the IRS, begging the agency to perform a
>
> "protective audit" on him.
> The Trentadue family believes a cover-up surrounding their loved one's
> death reaches to persons serving at the highest levels of
>
> government in the state of Oklahoma and the federal government at the
> time of Kenneth Trentadue's death.
> Recently the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Orrin Hatch,
> renewed his plea for the government to reveal what it knows
>
> about what happened to Kenneth Trentadue after he was brought to
> Oklahoma City in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing. Among
>
> the many questions family members are asking is: Did the government
> bring Kenneth Trentadue to Oklahoma City and torture him
>
> because federal agents mistakenly thought he was the elusive John Doe
> 2 - once the subject of a nationwide manhunt after the April
>
> 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma
> City?
>
> Oklahoma City was the center of the news universe throughout much of
> 1995. The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building
>
> focused the world's attention on the state Capitol where journalists
> from around the globe filed thousands of stories about the April 19
>
> bloody terrorist attack that took the lives of 168 persons, 19 of them
> children.
>
> On August 10, 1995, indictments were handed down in Oklahoma City by a
> federal grand jury.
> After months of hearing witnesses and examining physical evidence, the
> panel found there was sufficient evidence to charge Timothy
>
> McVeigh and Terry Nichols as principals in a conspiracy to bomb the
> Murrah federal building with a weapon of mass destruction.
>
> Grand jurors also concluded there were "others unknown" who helped the
> pair commit the terrible crime.
> Forty-eight hours after the indictments were announced, Nichols and
> McVeigh were brought into a packed federal courtroom for
>
> arraignment on multiple counts of murder and conspiracy.
>
> In the stately chamber only a block from where a 7,000-pound bomb
> decimated much of downtown Oklahoma City, the two former
>
> army buddies listened with heads bowed as the indictments were read.
> Also present, over a hundred reporters scribbling notes -
>
> occasionally looking up for a glimpse at the two most vilified men in
> the United States.
> The bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City was the most
> sensational crime in America since the assassination of President
>
> Kennedy. The spectacle drew scores of the most recognized reporters
> and journalists from around the world.
>
> On Aug. 18, only a few miles away from ground zero of the attack, a
> prisoner from California was very quietly whisked into Oklahoma
>
> City on a jet aircraft belonging to the Department of Justice. There
> were no news camera trucks or reporters there to record this event.
> Moments after landing, Kenneth Trentadue and a number of other
> prisoners were led in shackles into the U.S. Department of Justice
>
> Bureau of Prisons' new $80 million Federal Transfer Center (FTC)
> constructed for short-term confinement of some of the nation's most
>
> dangerous criminals.
> Whether the government's star witness in the Oklahoma City bombing
> case was also at the transfer center that day is a matter of
>
> speculation.
> Michael Fortier had been taken into federal custody on Aug. 7 after
> his formal plea agreement was approved and signed by U.S.
>
> Attorney Patrick Ryan and Oklahoma County District Attorney Bob Macy.
>
> Under heavy federal surveillance around the clock, Fortier had been
> cooperating for months with the FBI - providing snippets of
>
> information about McVeigh, Nichols, and their activities and
> associates.
> No evidence has been uncovered yet that Fortier ever mentioned to the
> FBI the name of Kenneth Trentadue or his alias, Paul
>
> Brockway - the name Trentadue used back in the days he robbed banks.
>
> However, records obtained by this newspaper do show that FBI agents
> during a long series of interviews on June 21 and 22, 1995,
>
> asked Fortier about McVeigh's connections to bank robberies. Fortier
> was vague about what he knew about McVeigh's associates and
>
> any bank robbery plot.
> McVeigh's sister, Jennifer, though, had already admitted under intense
> pressure that she helped launder proceeds from at least one
>
> bank robbery in which her brother participated.
> Jennifer McVeigh told the FBI on May 2, 1995, that her brother had
> been involved with a bank robbery group made up of like-minded
>
> men. Like Fortier, she divulged no names.
>
> Search for John Doe 2
>
> In the frantic days after the bombing, the FBI issued worldwide alerts
> focusing on a second subject present when the truck used to
>
> carry the explosives to the front entrance of the Murrah building was
> rented in central Kansas two days before the attack.
>
> By the date of the arraignments of McVeigh and Nichols, though, no
> further arrests
> had been made by the FBI in the bombing case.
> Appearing to step away from other suspects, the bureau seemed to be
> making an about-face in the high-profile case, telling the media
>
> that there may have been some confusion about a second subject at the
> truck rental. Maybe there wasn't a John Doe 2 after all.
>
> Justice Department officials told the press that the three witnesses
> at the truck rental might have been confused when they were
>
> originally interviewed.
> The clear impression given by these high-ranking officials was that
> the witnesses from Elliott's Body Shop recanted their earlier
>
> statements regarding the presence of someone else with McVeigh when
> the truck was rented.
> And finding out otherwise was impossible for most reporters, because
> the witnesses in Kansas were under intense pressure by the
>
> FBI not to talk to the press. A full-time private security guard had
> even been placed at the Junction City, Kan., business to keep the
>
> media away.
>
> As a result of all the secrecy, few outside the top rungs of the FBI
> and Justice Department were aware that a number of suspects were
>
> still at large.
> However, senior level FBI agents working the case knew that the
> witnesses at Elliott's Body Shop never wavered in their belief a
>
> second subject was with McVeigh when the truck was rented.
>
> And the bureau was certain that the man with McVeigh at the truck
> rental was not Terry Nichols. Nichols had an ironclad alibi for that
>
> time, placing him many miles away when the truck was rented.
>
> The description
>
> In the wake of the bombing, federal agents distributed a description
> of the man who was present when the Ryder truck was in Kansas.
>
> John Doe 2 was variously described to be muscular, with a dark
> complexion, 185 pounds, approximately 5-foot-eight to five-foot-10
>
> inches tall, and bearing a tattoo on his left arm. Several reports
> stated that he could be driving an older model pickup truck.
> According to an employee at Elliott's shop where the Ryder truck was
> rented, John Doe 2 had a very unusual tattoo partially visible
>
> beneath his T-shirt.
> Mechanic Tom Kessinger told federal agents that it might have been a
> tattoo of a serpent or dragon.
>
> Kessinger explained his early dealings with the FBI in a 1996
> interview with this reporter.
> "I just saw part of a tattoo that I thought could have been the tail
> of something below his shirt, John Doe 2's T-shirt. I told the FBI it
>
> may have been the tail of something like a dragon or serpent. I could
> only see a part of the tattoo. I was guessing about the part that
>
> was hidden under the shirt I couldn't see."
> Regardless of the fact the witnesses at the truck rental were holding
> firm, by the time the much-anticipated murder and conspiracy
>
> trials for McVeigh and Nichols began in Denver in 1997, the government
> was working overtime trying to dismiss evidence that there
>
> had ever been a John Doe 2, or any other suspects that might muddy
> their cases against McVeigh and Nichols.
>
> Also at this time, the Justice Department was under tremendous
> pressure to explain one of the most bizarre murders to ever take
>
> place in the federal prison system.
>
> The Trentadue nightmare
>
> According to Jesse Trentadue, his younger brother took a different
> route after their parents in 1961 uprooted and moved the family from
>
> the coal mining camps of West Virginia to the land of promise: sunny
> southern California.
> Jesse Trentadue sought a better life than his coal-mining father had
> known. He would find it through a good education.
> With an athletic scholarship to pave the way, the older brother
> graduated from the University of Southern California and then Jesse
>
> Trentadue went on to study law at the University of Idaho.
>
> Kenneth Trentadue traveled a much different route to his fortunes: He
> robbed banks.
> In 1982, Kenneth Trentadue was arrested and sent to federal prison
> where he served six years for his criminal lifestyle.
> At the age of 37, he came out of prison with a new perspective. He set
> out to get married, raise a family and take what legitimate jobs
>
> he could find.
> "My brother was pretty easy going about life," Jesse told this
> newspaper. "His wife Carmen is Hispanic with family and property in
>
> Mexico. Jesse took construction jobs in the states when the family
> needed money. Much of the time they spent at Carmen's place in
>
> Mexico or in San Diego."
>
> Still responsible for living up to the terms of his parole agreement,
> Kenneth Trentadue had a real problem with his parole officer - the
>
> fellow wouldn't let him drink beer.
> "We went through the administrative hearing process trying to get the
> beer drinking ban lifted," Jesse Trentadue recalled.
> "Kenny was working, married and a good provider. He just wanted to be
> able to have a beer. They wouldn't let him. So in 1989, Kenny
>
> just quit reporting to his parole officer and a warrant was issued. No
> one came looking for him. And nothing came of it until 1995."
>
> It was just weeks after the Oklahoma City bombing when a border guard
> near San Diego stopped Kenneth Trentadue while he was
>
> making one of his regular trips into the country for work. The
> arresting officer said he thought Ken Trentadue was drunk.
> Days later, on July 10, 1995, U.S. Marshals took Trentadue into
> federal custody after locating him at the county jail on the Mexican
>
> border.
> Documents obtained by the McCurtain Daily Gazette show that the
> arresting officer noted Trentadue's alias of Vance Paul Brockway,
>
> his height, 5 feet, 8 inches; weight, 200 pounds; brown hair; brown
> eyes and a dragon tattoo on his left arm - visible all the way to his
>
> elbow.
>
> Adding to the suspicious nature of the situation, Trentadue did not
> divulge his wife's name or U.S. address - only providing authorities
>
> his parents' address in Westminster, Calif., as a contact.
> When this information was compiled, an unfortunate picture emerged:
> Trentadue appeared to be an almost perfect match for the
>
> subject of a worldwide manhunt: John Doe 2.
> Making matters even more suspicious, Trentadue was driving a 1986
> Chevy pickup very similar to the one the FBI believed John Doe 2
>
> might be traveling in. And possibly sealing his fate, the arresting
> officer noted that a check of the national database of criminal
> records
>
> turned up four hits for Trentadue, a.k.a Vance Paul Brockway - at
> least one was for bank robbery.
>
> Suddenly, after six years of being ignored by the authorities, Kenneth
> Trentadue was arrested and flown all the way to Oklahoma City -
>
> supposedly to attend a hearing for violating his parole agreement in
> southern California.
> His family now wonders if Trentadue might not have really been a
> target for interrogation by agents working the OKBOMB case. But
>
> whatever the reason for Trentadue's Aug. trip to Oklahoma City soon
> turned to disaster.
>
> On the morning of Aug. 21, the acting warden at the Oklahoma City
> Federal Transfer Center, Marie Carter, called Trentadue's mother
>
> to inform her that her son had committed suicide hours earlier.
> During this brief conversation, Trentadue family members say the
> prison official asked for permission to cremate the body.
> Mrs. Trentadue said she would consult the rest of the family,
> including the widow.
> The acting warden responded, "He's not married?"
> Stunned but suspicious, the mother of the deceased told the prison
> official, "Yes, he's married and he also has a 2-month-old child
>
> and his brother is a lawyer. We'll get back to you!"
>
> Recently, Jesse Trentadue told this newspaper: "When we look back on
> that first conversation with the acting warden, she didn't know
>
> Kenny's real name or anything about him that was accurate. She seemed
> to think she knew everything about someone that he wasn't.
>
> Who the hell did she really think he was? Did someone kill him trying
> to get him to confess to being involved with the Oklahoma
>
> bombing?
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/kenneth_michael_trentadue_01.htm
>
> In the matter of Kenneth Michael Trentadue (Part 2/5)
>
> J.D. Cash / McCurtain Dailey Gazette | April 7, 2004
>
> When two members of the Oklahoma Medical Examiner's office arrived at
> the sparkling new Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center
>
> (FTC) at 7 a.m. on Aug. 21, 1995, what they found in the infirmary was
> the body of a man badly bruised, bloody and his throat cut.
>
> Guards and supervisors at the institution were calling it a suicide.
>
> When questioned in more detail by the medical examiner's investigator,
> Tammi Gillis, Federal Transfer Center personnel stood by their
>
> story that the subject hanged himself while in isolation. One even
> said he thought the inmate had tried to slash his throat first. It was
> a
>
> bizarre story even from the beginning.
> Adding to the strange nature of the situation, prison officials
> refused Gillis access to
>
> the cell where the inmate was supposedly found - a clear violation of
> Oklahoma law.
> Gillis was told the inmate on the gurney, with his scalp split to the
> skull in three places and throat slashed from ear to ear, had used
>
> his bed sheet and a couple of tubes of toothpaste to commit suicide.
> Numerous bruises on the inmate's feet, legs, torso, both arms and back
> were passed off as self-inflicted, also, by the center staff.
>
> Officials at the prison said they found the inmate hanging from a
> grate mounted on the wall in his cell at 3 a.m., during a routine
>
> inspection made by a guard on his regular rounds of the Special
> Housing Unit (SHU).
>
> The SHU at the Oklahoma City facility is a high-security unit where
> prisoners are kept in solitary confinement, safe from other
>
> inmates.
>
> Inmate records obtained from the institution reflect that the subject
> was strip searched before entering the SHU, 17 hours before his
>
> death. At that time, guards only noted a single blister on one of the
> inmate's feet and listed no other medical problems.
>
> Inspection denied
>
> After a closer physical examination of the body revealed a myriad of
> bruises and serious wounds, Gillis once again demanded an
>
> inspection of the cell for evidence of foul play. The investigator
> suspected that the inmate had been subjected to a violent beating.
>
> Federal Transfer Center officials responded that a federal
> investigation was taking place and any investigation by the medical
>
> examiner's office would have to be put on hold.
>
> Voluminous evidence would later surface, however, that proved the
> staff at the center were not investigating anything at the time of
> the
>
> incident.
>
> No meaningful outside investigation was done that day by any federal
> or state agency. The staff at the center, however, tried to turn
>
> away outside investigators at the same time the scene of Trentadue's
> death was undergoing changes.
>
> Records later would show that even before Gillis arrived to
> investigate the inmate's death, an Oklahoma City police officer was
> also
>
> turned away when he arrived to investigate why an ambulance was
> initially called to resuscitate a suicide victim.
>
> Like Gillis, the police were told federal officials would take care of
> their own investigation. Later, investigators would discover that the
>
> ambulance team had been turned away at the gates.
>
> Denied unfettered access to the inside of the cell, Gillis was only
> offered a brief look through the window on the door of the A709.
>
> After a quick peek, the state investigator and her assistant left with
> Trentadue's body.
>
> Records obtained by this newspaper indicate the pair were only on
> federal property 20 minutes that morning.
>
> Trentadue held under
>
> an alias at center
>
> Documents obtained by the McCurtain Daily Gazette reveal a most
> unusual fact: Kenneth Trentadue was not listed at the Oklahoma
>
> City Federal Transfer Center by his real name. Instead, the inmate was
> listed as Paul Vance Brockway - an alias Trentadue used
>
> many years earlier.
>
> And there would be more mysteries to emerge from the Oklahoma City
> Federal Transfer Center as Trentadue's death came under
>
> scrutiny.
>
> According to Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue, his mother
> received notification of his brother's death on the morning of Aug.
> 21
>
> from Marie Carter, acting warden at the Oklahoma City facility.
>
> "After they told my mother that Kenny had killed himself, they said
> they wanted to cremate the body and send the ashes to us. My
>
> mother refused," Trentadue told this newspaper.
>
> "I knew this was all bull---! Kenny had been on the phone with us a
> day or so earlier and was fine. He had no reason to kill himself. He
>
> hadn't committed a serious crime. He had been working, taking care of
> his family. He messed up with his parole officer, but was not
>
> robbing banks. Kenny was just going to appear before a hearing on a
> minor parole violation. He had a new baby and a wife to come
>
> back home to. If he had to serve a few weeks on the parole violation,
> no big deal."
>
> Deep suspicions
>
> The Trentadue family was not the only group to find the government's
> suicide story hard to believe.
>
>>From the outset, the Oklahoma State Medical Examiner's staff was
>
> highly skeptical.
>
> The day following Trentadue's death, an Oklahoma City FBI agent
> received a murder complaint from Kevin Rowland, the medical
>
> examiner's lead investigator.
>
> Once the medical examiner's office completed the Trentadue autopsy,
> they found the suicide claim very unlikely.
>
> According to former FBI special agent Jeff Jenkins, Rowland told him
> in a telephone call that the inmate's wounds were inconsistent
>
> with a suicide and were likely the result of a murder.
>
> In a Dec. 6, 1995, internal FBI memo marked NOT APPROPRIATE FOR
> DISSEMINATION TO THE PUBLIC, special agent Jenkins
>
> advised his superiors that the Oklahoma Medical Examiner's official
> findings would, "...likely rule that Trentadue's death was a
>
> homicide."
>
> The memo went on to advise the Asst. Special Agent in Charge of the
> Oklahoma City FBI office that efforts were being made by
>
> Federal Transfer Center personnel to avoid polygraph examinations
> concerning the inmate's death.
>
> "SA Jenkins stated that the new warden at the FTC will not allow any
> of the guards/officials to take polygraph examinations. The
>
> prison guards are represented by a strong union which will probably
> also object to their members taking a polygraph."
>
> Destroying evidence?
>
> Material obtained by this newspaper reveals that destruction of
> potential evidence by guards and officials at the FTC in Oklahoma
> City
>
> began in earnest on Aug. 21, 1995 - moments after Kenneth Trentadue
> took his last breath.
>
> As soon as the medical examiner's investigator left with Trentadue's
> body, a team of guards and inmates began cleaning all the blood
>
> from the cell, before the local FBI or Bureau of Prisons special
> investigators flying in from Texas could conduct outside
> investigations
>
> as required by law.
>
> In a sealed report of the investigation obtained by this newspaper,
> the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) for the Department of
>
> Justice determined that staff members at the Oklahoma City Federal
> Transfer Center immediately destroyed crime scene evidence
>
> and several months later lied about what they had done to federal
> investigators and grand jurors.
>
> The man responsible for securing Trentadue's cell, Lt. Kenneth W.
> Freeman, was charged under law with notifying the FBI of the
>
> inmate's suspicious death so agents could investigate the scene.
>
> Freeman was the special investigative supervisor responsible for
> conducting the initial investigation of Trentadue's death.
>
> The Office of Inspector General found that Freeman did not immediately
> contact the FBI as the law required.
>
> Instead, the OIG determined that center officials set about the
> process of cleaning the cell after learning that a special team of
> Bureau
>
> of Prisons investigators were winging their way to Oklahoma City for
> an internal investigation and could arrive at any moment.
>
> Dated November 1999, the OIG report states:
>
> "Later that morning (Aug. 21, 1995), Associate Warden Flowers decided
> that Trentadue's cell should be cleaned. Flowers told the OIG
>
> that when he asked Freeman during the morning of Aug. 21 if the FBI
> had been notified, Freeman told him the FBI had been notified
>
> and had instructed Freeman to send in a report about the incident. In
> addition, Flowers said that he had been informed by the FTC
>
> medical staff that Trentadue's blood count indicated a high
> probability that he was HIV-positive. (In fact, he was not HIV-
> positive.)
>
> Flowers said he thought the cell should be cleaned promptly because of
> the potentially infectious blood. ... Flowers said he therefore
>
> instructed the FTC health unit to clean the cell.
>
> "Although the center staff had been told by the medical examiner's
> office that the condition of the body required them to immediately
>
> report the incident to the FBI and be careful to treat the cell as a
> crime scene and not disturb anything, the OIG report notes that
>
> statements made by the center's special investigative supervisor, Lt.
> Freeman, were not truthful about how he handled the situation.
>
> However, contrary to Freeman's representations, he still had not
> spoken to the FBI when he told Flowers he had. SA Jenkins stated
>
> that Freeman did not speak with him until approximately 11:30 a.m.
> Although Freeman falsely represented to the BOP and other
>
> investigators about when he first spoke with Jenkins, Freeman
> eventually admitted to the OIG that he had tried to contact Jenkins
>
> early in the morning on Aug. 21, but he did not provide full details
> about Trentadue's death. Although their recollections of the
>
> conversation of Aug. 21 differed, Freeman said he told Jenkins that
> FTC correction officers had found Trentadue hanging in a secure
>
> cell, that Trentadue had committed suicide by hanging himself, and
> that there was a little bit of blood. Jenkins said that Freeman did
>
> not mention any blood and did not describe the extent of Trentadue's
> injuries. ... At approximately 1 p.m., FTC medical staff and
>
> inmates cleaned Trentadue's cell."
>
> The OIG investigation record is replete with details that while staff
> at the center mopped up blood from the floor and wiped away
>
> bloodstains from walls and furniture, others removed the bed sheet
> that Trentadue was supposed to have used to hang himself.
>
> Also, most of the inmate's clothing would disappear that day. And
> prior to the rush to clean the cell, some photographs and a
>
> videotape were made of the scene and victim. Much of this evidence
> would also disappear - some for years, some forever.
>
> At 2 p.m., the Bureau of Prison's Psychological Reconstruction Team
> landed in Oklahoma City to conduct an investigation that is
>
> required under BOP rules of every suspected inmate suicide case.
>
> But once on Federal Transfer Center grounds, investigators would be
> shocked to discover the cell had been meticulously cleaned and
>
> what little evidence remained in the cell had been rearranged by the
> staff. The next day the team would leave Oklahoma City, unable to
>
> conduct a meaningful investigation.
>
> The OIG report notes that transfer center officials had been aware
> since 8 a.m. that this special unit would be arriving that day.
>
> Subsequent state and federal investigations concluded that by the time
> the team of Bureau of Prisons investigators walked into the
>
> facility, crucial evidence that might implicate others had been
> removed or washed away.
>
> While the methodical destruction of the crime scene evidence was going
> forward, the Federal Transfer Center's psychologist, David
>
> Wedeking, had a meeting with his superiors.
>
> After the meeting, Wedeking prepared a suicide watch report stating
> that Trentadue had been placed on a suicide watch shortly before
>
> his death. It was a lie.
>
> While under oath, later, Wedeking admitted the report was false and
> that inmate Kenneth Trentadue was never under a suicide watch.
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/kenneth_michael_trentadue_02.htm
>
> In the matter of Kenneth Michael Trentadue (Part 3/5)
>
> J.D. Cash / McCurtain Dailey Gazette | April 7, 2004
>
> Shortly after the bloody body of the inmate was discovered hanging
> from a bed sheet in a solitary confinement cell at the Oklahoma
>
> City Federal Transfer Center (FTC), over a thousand miles away an
> unsuspecting family received the shocking news that a loved one
>
> had committed suicide.
>
> The dead man's brother, lawyer Jesse Trentadue, recalled the events
> for this newspaper.
> "Acting Warden Marie Carter called my mother, Wilma Trentadue, at
> about 7 a.m. West Coast time on Aug. 21, 1995, and said my
>
> brother had committed suicide. She tried to get my mother to agree to
> cremate the body and even offered to pay for the cremation.
>
> "We now know that BOP (Bureau of Prisons) regulations do not allow for
> cremation. My mother told Carter that funeral arrangements
>
> would be the decision of Kenney's wife, Carmen. When Carter heard that
> she went ballistic, telling my mother that Kenney did not
>
> have a wife, my mother told Carter he did and that I would be
> contacting Carter to deal with funeral arrangements and that I was a
>
> lawyer.
>
> "Carter lost it again, telling my mother that Kenney did not have a
> brother. My mother said yes, he did. He had two brothers and a
>
> sister."
>
> "About 8 a.m. on the 21st, Trentadue continued: "My mother calls and
> tells me about Kenney's death. I was stunned. I had just
>
> spoken with him the evening of the 19th and nothing was unusual. I was
> immediately suspicious. So, too, was everyone in our family. I
>
> contacted Carmen to tell her about Kenney's death, but first called
> Carmen's sisters so they would be there when the bad news
>
> arrived. Kenney's son was about 2 months old at the time.
>
> "Later that morning, I called Carter, who seemed very defensive. I
> kept asking for an autopsy and she refused, saying that my mother
>
> would have to ask for one in writing. I explained to Carter that I was
> a lawyer and represented my family and that we wanted an
>
> autopsy. She still refused. I had to prepare written authorizations
> for an autopsy, have my mother sign them and send them to Carter."
>
> What the Trentadue family and possibly even the acting warden at the
> Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center didn't know was at that
>
> moment an autopsy was already under way.
>
> "We did not know that an autopsy was being done as Carter and I
> spoke," Jesse Trentadue commented. "I don't believe she knew
>
> either until later that day. After I told Carter we wanted my brother
> sent home, not cremated, I subsequently learned that Carter called
>
> the medical examiner's office to ask what she needed to do to have the
> body cremated.
>
> The medical examiner's investigator, Kevin Rowland, told Carter she
> would need our consent. It was then Carter learned of the autopsy
>
> and sent over a request to the medical examiner to do an autopsy that
> had already been done. All Carter or anyone would say was
>
> that he had killed himself."
>
> When the medical examiner's report of investigation was eventually
> released, Dr. Fred B. Jordan listed more than two-dozen injuries to
>
> the body of Kenneth Trentadue. Literally from his feet to the top of
> his head, Trentadue received a large number of bruises and
>
> lacerations before he took his last breath, experts said.
>
> What the experts don't agree on is who was responsible for the
> remarkable condition of the inmate's body.
>
> The Trentadue family and their experts say their loved one was
> tortured and killed by the government.
>
> The government takes the position the inmate spent a considerable
> amount of time and energy trying to kill himself that night in the
>
> cell.
>
> Both theories are bizarre and both sides have spent huge sums trying
> to establish the more convincing case.
>
> During the autopsy examination, Dr. Jordan photographed three large
> wounds to Trentadue's skull, injuries consistent with blows from
>
> a blunt instrument.
>
> Also, Jordon noted that Trentadue's throat had been slashed. All this
> the staff at the center claimed the 44-year-old parole violator
>
> accomplished before he supposedly hanged himself.
>
> For nearly three years after this autopsy, the Oklahoma chief medical
> examiner refused to issue a final determination on a cause of
>
> death for Kenneth Trentadue. Instead, Dr. Jordan's initial finding was
> death by asphyxiation, "cause unknown."
>
> As a result of his reluctance to agree with prison officials that the
> case was suicide and therefore close the investigation, as well as
>
> the Trentadue family's belief that their loved one was murdered, years
> of investigations have followed and millions of dollars expended
>
> trying to determine, or some would say cover up, what really happened
> that night in cell 709A at the FTC in Oklahoma City.
>
> Federal refusal to cooperate
>
> Within 24 hours of receiving the bloody and battered body for autopsy,
> an assistant medical examiner called the Oklahoma City FBI
>
> office and reported that Trentadue's injuries were consistent with a
> beating and murder - certainly not a suicide. The medical
>
> examiner's office also advised the FBI to treat Trentadue's death as a
> homicide.
>
> Special agent Jeff Jenkins recorded this exchange in an FBI report
> obtained by the McCurtain Daily Gazette.
>
> "A subsequent autopsy by the State Medical Examiner in Oklahoma City
> revealed that (Trentadue) had been severely beaten prior to
>
> death by asphyxiation."
>
> However, the FBI was not talking to the family at this time and the
> report was not available in the days following Trentadue's death.
>
> Certainly the Bureau of Prisons had not disclosed the extent of the
> inmate's injuries or any other information to the family regarding
>
> Trentadue's final days in federal custody.
>
> While officials declined to speak on the record, the body was sent
> from the medical examiner's office over to a funeral home to be
>
> prepared for viewing and burial. It would take a lot of makeup to make
> the body presentable for the family.
>
> Jesse Trentadue recalled the shipment of his brother home: "The body
> did not arrive in Orange County until the next Saturday. I had to
>
> repeatedly call the FTC to inquire about having the body shipped home.
> It took almost a week and many heated conversations with the
>
> FTC administration. They did not want to release him and I now know
> why.
>
> "I was in Utah preparing to travel to California when his body
> arrived. My mother, sister and Kenney's wife went immediately to the
>
> funeral home and took a camera.
>
> "The body was heavily made up so that all of the injuries were
> concealed except for his slashed throat. No makeup was placed on that
>
> wound; in fact, the collar on his shirt was deliberately turned down
> so that the wound was obvious. I suspect they wanted us to think
>
> that was a rope burn."
>
> He explained that the women took the most important step in the
> family's early investigation. "My mother, sister and Carmen had
>
> Kenney's clothes removed and took a few photographs. They took the
> camera with them because we knew that if Kenney were
>
> murdered, he would go down fighting. When I arrived, we spent the
> better part of a morning photographing and videotaping Kenney's
>
> body. It turned out that we have the only photographs of many of his
> injuries."
>
> The Trentadues contacted the Oklahoma chief medical examiner in
> person. Jesse Trentadue explained the revelations that emerged
>
> from this initial meeting.
>
> "Jordan repeatedly told us this was a murder, but because the crime
> scene had been destroyed, he had to list the manner of death as
>
> unknown. He also looked my mother, Carmen and sister in the eye and
> told them he would never go back on them."
>
> Bitter after years of disappointments, Jesse Trentadue recalls now,
> that, "In the weeks following Kenney's murder, I went to Dallas,
>
> Texas, to speak with the BOP's regional counsel Michael Hood. Hood
> told me the BOP investigation was over, but would not tell me
>
> the conclusion.
>
> "Hood also suggested that we had done the injuries to Kenney's body.
> Hood made one comment that I will always remember. He said,
>
> 'The BOP, FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office - we're one big ole' Justice
> Department.'"
>
> Trentadue explained his frustrations further: "But when I would ask
> for information, I was repeatedly told to file a Freedom of
> Information
>
> Act Request. No one within the government would talk to us. In fact,
> on Sept. 1, 1995, the BOP issued a press release saying that
>
> Kenney's death had tentatively been ruled suicide and that all of his
> wounds were self-inflicted. That press release occurred after my
>
> brother's body arrived home and after we had discovered the trauma."
>
> The BOP's declaration of suicide had no legal effect. It was designed
> for the media. The person with the authority of determine the
>
> legal cause of death was with the Oklahoma medical examiner's office
> and Dr. Jordan was still uncommitted.
>
> Jesse Trentadue said the next step was to lobby senior members of the
> Department of Justice.
>
> "By early October, I had gone up the DOJ food chain to Janet Reno,
> because by early October, I knew the BOP was lying to me, but I
>
> did not suspect the FBI until later."
>
> It would be more than two years before Trentadue would learn that the
> FBI had not even inspected the death scene in a timely manner
>
> after receiving the medical examiner's opinion that Kenneth
> Trentadue's case should be worked as a homicide.
>
> Instead, more damning information concerning the government's
> questionable investigation of his brother's mysterious death would be
>
> investigated and confirmed by Justice Department officials, but no one
> would lose his job or be sent to prison as a result.
>
> One sickening thing to the Trentadue family is the Office of Inspector
> General's findings that Federal Transfer Center staff admitted
>
> lying about important facts in the investigation. Beyond committing
> perjury, some staff members admitted destroying evidence in the
>
> case.
>
> But most upsetting to the family are admissions from the staff that
> key medical personnel were not allowed to administer first aid to
>
> Trentadue during the first minutes after the inmate's body was found
> hanging in his cell.
>
> Jesse Trentadue calls the whole thing a murder and sloppy cover-up
> that no one has paid for.
>
> "My brother didn't have a reason to kill himself. Someone else did it.
> We want to know who and why!"
>
> The Ricks investigation
>
> Oklahoma City FBI Special Agent-in-Charge Bob Ricks assigned the
> gruesome homicide investigation to an agent known to complain
>
> he couldn't bear to look at pictures of dead people.
>
> In spite of the problem, Special Agent Jeff Jenkins was handed the
> case by a man only days from leaving the bureau.
>
> Ricks had been ordered out of the FBI by director Louis Freeh only
> days after the Oklahoma City bombing.
>
> Ricks now admits he stopped a raid that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco
> and Firearms had planned on a group of radicals at Elohim
>
> City, which Timothy McVeigh had contacted only a few days before the
> bomb blast in Oklahoma City left 168 dead, including 19
>
> children.
>
> Like Ricks, Jenkins' days at the bureau were numbered. Evidence
> suggests Jenkins' ouster was not linked to the bombing of the OKC
>
> federal building but problems with his handling of the Trentadue
> matter.
>
> Instead of getting in his car and immediately going across town to the
> Federal Transfer Center to begin the crucial process of
>
> conducting interviews and collecting evidence while the scene was
> fresh, Jenkins stayed in his Oklahoma City office that afternoon
>
> and then went home to enjoy the next day off as paid leave.
>
> While the official case agent lolled, inmates were transferred from
> the Oklahoma City prison, and the cell where Trentadue is believed
>
> to have died was scrubbed clean.
>
> When Jenkins did finally manage to make it to the facility on the 24th
> - a full three days after the death was reported - the agent failed
>
> to conduct a single interview with an inmate, nor did he bother to
> visit the cell where the body was reported to have been cut down.
>
> Instead, Jenkins spent the first day at the facility with the acting
> warden and two members of her staff. What evidence Jenkins
>
> collected that day he later admitted was either placed under his desk
> or left in his car trunk.
>
> A subsequent investigation by the Office of Inspector General for the
> Justice Department concluded that pieces of blood-soaked
>
> evidence that might have yielded DNA evidence linking other persons to
> the scene putrefied in the agent's car truck in the stifling hot
>
> August Oklahoma weather.
>
> By the time the evidence was turned over, it was impossible for the
> FBI lab to examine for clues of other suspects.
>
> The FBI said nothing of this to the family. Evidence of the
> extraordinary amount of missing and destroyed evidence in the case
> would
>
> keep FBI and BOP officials busy explaining for years to come.
>
> In the meantime, the Trentadue investigation languished.
>
> However, brother Jesse refused to wait. The lawyer began a national
> campaign for justice, lobbying hard for answers - coast to coast.
>
> "I had to beg to get the FBI to send anyone to our home to interview
> us about Kenney. Finally I flew to Oklahoma and took the pictures
>
> of Kenney we took after the body arrived in Utah. I knew we were in a
> lot of trouble when Jenkins said he couldn't look at those
>
> pictures, because he might get sick."
>
> Jordan frustrated, too
>
> Eventually the Oklahoma medical examiner became enraged over the FBI's
> lack of interest in the case, too. Like Jesse Trentadue, Dr.
>
> Jordan decided to make some phone calls. He took his complaints to the
> Justice Department, just as Trentadue had been doing.
>
> Sensing the pressure, the case agent on the investigation, Jeff
> Jenkins, wrote that he believed the medical examiner would eventually
>
> conclude that Trentadue was murdered.
>
> Jenkins notes' include references to the building media interest in
> case. His handwritten notes obtained by this newspaper describe
>
> Jordan to his superiors as: "A loose cannon." And in those same notes,
> Jenkins warns:
>
> "CBS been to ME's office earlier today. Talked to OC media rep and
> gave standard no comment on pending investigation. Things at
>
> the prison seem to have gotten a little more tense."
>
> Certainly the FBI had plenty of reason to worry about the media and
> Jordan.
>
> On Dec. 20, 1995, Dr. Jordan placed in his file a memo obtained by
> this newspaper listing efforts he was making to urge the FBI and
>
> Bureau of Prisons to do a proper investigation into Trentadue's death.
>
> In that memo, Jordan records that he placed a call to Eric Holder, a
> top official in Janet Reno's Justice Department in Washington,
>
> D.C.
>
> After failing to make contact with Holder, Jordan notes that he turned
> next to Asst. U.S. Attorney Arlene Joplin in Oklahoma City.
>
> "I advised her that I felt the Trentadue problem was a very serious
> issue that needed full support of the investigative services of the
> FBI.
>
> I believe I further informed her that last week in frustration I
> indicated to Agent Hunt of the FBI that it could not help but occur to
> me
>
> that perhaps the FBI and the BOP were not expediting this
> investigation as quickly as we hoped would occur. I told her I thought
> there
>
> was a very serious problem at the prison. And about that time, Mr.
> Ryan (U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Oklahoma) got on
>
> the line. I indicated that I felt Mr. Trentadue had been abused and
> tortured and at this point was not sure whether his death could be
>
> explained as a suicide or whether it should be regarded as a
> homicide."
>
> The memo concludes with Jordan's comments that Ryan thanked him for
> the information and gave him his pager number.
>
> Festering with rage, Jesse Trentadue felt the local FBI had no
> intention of conducting a real investigation, either. The Salt Lake
> City
>
> attorney began a letter-writing and information campaign of his own,
> sometimes even plastering gory pictures of his bloodied brother at
>
> bus stops and posting them on the Internet.
>
> In a letter accusing the BOP of murder, Trentadue wrote: "I will
> always be grateful to my brother for his love of life, great heart
> and
>
> strength. Had my brother been less of a man, your guards would have
> been able to kill him without inflicting so much injury to his
>
> body. Had that occurred, Kenney's family would forever have been guilt-
> ridden over his death. Each of us would have lived with the pain
>
> of thinking that Kenneth took his own life and that we had somehow
> failed him. By making the fight he did for his life, Ken has saved
>
> us that pain and God bless for having done so!"
>
> After years to reflect on his ordeals and his loss, Trentadue told
> this newspaper: "The only other thing I remember saying during those
>
> early days was in response to a question: Why should people get upset
> over the death of a parole violator?
>
> "My response: Because the Department of Justice did this and that
> should scare the hell out of every American. I believe that now
>
> more than ever!"
>
> In the next installment: The pace of state and federal government
> investigations pick up only after the Trentadue family and the media
>
> begin asking questions. At this same time, pressure is brought by
> local and federal law enforcement officers on the state medical
>
> examiner to change his opinion of Trentadue's death from "unknown" to
> "suicide."
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/kenneth_michael_trentadue_03.htm
>
> In the matter of Kenneth Michael Trentadue (Part 4/5)
>
> J.D. Cash / McCurtain Dailey Gazette | April 7, 2004http://www.mccurtain.com/articles/2004/04/07/okc_bombing/okc10.text.txt
>
> Oklahoma's Chief Medical Examiner Fred Jordan, M.D., was a very
> worried and nervous man for years after he autopsied the remains
>
> of Kenneth Michael Trentadue.
>
> In Jordan's long career as the state's medical examiner, his record
> had been a good one - marked with accolades for his abilities in
>
> solving many difficult cases. Indeed, Jordan was deeply respected by
> his peers and the law enforcement community. Even most
>
> criminal defense lawyers practicing in Oklahoma believed Jordan and
> his staff labored hard and their work was unbiased.
>
> The year of 1995, though, tested Jordan and his staff as few medical
> examiners' offices around the world had ever been tested.
>
> On April 19, Jordan's office arrived at the bombed-out remains of the
> Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to begin the process of
>
> establishing positive identifications for 168 bodies, several mangled
> beyond easy recognition after a 7,000-pound truck bomb was set
>
> off in front of the nine-story structure.
>
> Shortly after that gruesome task was accomplished the bloody and
> heavily bruised body of 44-year-old Kenneth Trentadue arrived from
>
> the new Federal Transfer Center where the inmate had been held on a
> parole violation for only three days.
>
> Prison officials surmised the inmate had committed suicide by hanging,
> after beating himself repeatedly and cutting his throat.
>
> After carefully examining the body, Jordan was convinced it was
> murder. And since the prison admitted Trentadue was being held in
>
> isolation, away from other prisoners, that turned the spotlight
> directly on federal workers.
>
> Cover-up began immediately
>
> At the very beginning of his department's investigation into the
> August 21, 1995 brutal death, the FBI and the Bureau of Prisons (BOP)
>
> refused to cooperate. An investigation by the Department of Justice
> Inspector General would later report outrageous examples of
>
> perjury and mishandling of evidence in the case.
>
> Officials at the Oklahoma City Transfer facility initially barred
> Jordan's investigators from the cell after the body of Kenneth
> Trentadue
>
> had been found. And the FBI later admitted their agents misplaced or
> destroyed critical crime scene evidence they received in their
>
> own investigation.
>
> Jesse Trentadue summarized his experiences with federal agencies
> working on the case this way: "The government accused everyone
>
> of wrongdoing. They even accused us of having mutilated my brother's
> body and said that Kenney killed himself because he had AIDS.
>
> (Jordan proved he did not)
>
> "The government was especially concerned about the Medical Examiner's
> Office because of all the evidence we were providing to Dr.
>
> Jordan and his Chief Investigator Kevin Rowland. In fact, we were the
> source of most of the evidence the Medical Examiner's Office
>
> received since they were getting nothing from the government, not even
> cooperation.
>
> "The government infiltrated and/or controlled every "investigation"
> into Kenney's death. And if it could not do that, the government
>
> interfered with those investigations by destroying or withholding
> evidence. I now see that from the minute Kenney drew his last breath,
>
> the government reacted like some wounded animal using all of its
> strength, powers and resources to protect itself."
>
> Jordan under pressure
>
> Echoing many of Jesse Trentadues conclusions, during a rare interview
> for Fox News on July 3, 1997, Dr. Jordan bared many of his
>
> own concerns as he publicly called for a county grand jury
> investigation into the bizarre death of Kenneth Trentadue. The
> remarkable
>
> exchange opens with Jordan pointing the finger at the federal
> government as the culprit in the murder and cover-up.
>
> "I think it's very likely he (Kenneth Trentadue) was murdered. I'm not
> able to prove it. I have temporarily classified the death as
>
> undetermined. You see a body covered with blood, removed from the room
> as Mr. Trentadue was, soaked in blood covered with
>
> bruises, and you try to gain access to the scene and the government of
> the United State says no, you can't.
>
> "They continue to prohibit us from having access to the scene of his
> death, which is unheard of in 1997, until about five months later.
>
> When we went in there and luminalled, it lit up like a candle because
> blood was still present on the walls of the room after four or five
>
> months. But at that point we have no crime scene, so there are still
> questions about the death of Kenneth Trentadue that will never be
>
> answered because of the actions of the U.S. government.
>
> "Whether those actions were intentional - whether they were
> incompetence, I don't know - it's not easy to communicate with the
>
> federal government. It was botched. Or worse, it was planned."
>
> The huge problem created for Jordan and his staff was the government
> cleaned up the cell where they said Trentadue killed himself.
>
> Adding to suspicions, the medical examiner's office was kept away from
> the cell for five months.
>
> During this time, Jordan would later learn that a huge volume of
> evidence in the case disappeared and some was destroyed. Key
>
> witnesses interviewed by authorities would subsequently admit they
> initially lied to federal investigators and grand jurors, as well.
>
> The victim's brother, Jesse Trentadue, told this newspaper, "At first
> we pinned so much hope on Dr. Jordan. He seemed sincere to us.
>
> He knew Kenny did not kill himself, but had been killed. He promised
> our family he would never give up on this case until he found the
>
> truth. He also promised he wouldn't buckle under all the pressure he
> was being hit with by the FBI.
>
> "The government desperately needed Jordan to rule the case a suicide
> so they could stop a grand jury and other federal investigations
>
> from going forward. Jordan was the key they needed to close the case
> and he wouldn't."
>
> In notes obtained by this newspaper, an FBI agent reported the medical
> examiner's original stalwart position that Dr. Jordan was: "A
>
> loose cannon." And furthermore, the FBI agent noted, "The medical
> examiner's findings will probably rule that the death was a
>
> homicide."
>
> Growing nervous by FBI agents repeated attempts to pressure him to
> rule the case a suicide, Jordan began contacting officials he
>
> believed would help him.
>
> After the United State's Attorney General, Janet Reno, refused his
> phone calls, Jordan was successful in getting the attention of U.S.
>
> Attorney Patrick Ryan in Oklahoma City, after he told one of Ryan's
> assistants that Trentadue was probably killed by persons
>
> employed by the federal government.
>
> During the exchange, Ryan says he will pursue the case and take
> Jordan's evidence before a federal grand jury.
>
> Despite these assurances, the FBI continued to pressure the Oklahoma
> medical examiner to declare the inmate's death a suicide.
>
> Desperate for protection from government retribution, Jordan began
> contacting other officials about his fears.
>
> An example of Jordan's concerns are reflected in a letter to the
> Commissioner of the IRS, Margaret Milner Richardson.
>
> Dated Aug. 25, 1997, the letter said: "The requirements of my job as
> Chief Medical Examiner for the State of Oklahoma are frequently
>
> currently bringing me into an uncomfortable juxtaposition with the
> United States Department of Justice.
>
> "In order to protect myself from retribution I would like information
> as to how to request a protective audit from your agency. By this, I
>
> simply mean a standard audit in order to avoid having your agency used
> to harass me as I proceed with my inquiries into a death that
>
> directly relates to the Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City."
>
> As the FBI continued to pressure Jordan in 1997, the medical examiner
> also sought political protection from various elected officials.
>
> Jordan fights back
>
> In a handwritten memo obtained by the McCurtain Daily Gazette, Jordan
> records the highpoints of a telephone call he made to North
>
> Dakota's United States Senator Byron L. Dorgan.
>
> Explaining his difficult situation, the ME noted that he told the
> senator that the Trentadue investigation had been "... crippled by
> the
>
> federal government and that Kenneth Trentadue was at the least beaten
> before he died." Jordan added: "Reiterated my lack of trust in
>
> the federal government; things inside the D.C. beltway; and the Dept
> of Justice in particular."
>
> With the Department of Justice at this time mired in a civil suit with
> the Trentadue family, lawyers in the civil division of the Justice
>
> Department appeared to be using the FBI to pressure the medical
> examiner into changing his ruling.
>
> Also casting long shadows over the matter, several important senators
> had begun asking questions and threatening Janet Reno with a
>
> full Senate Judiciary Committee investigation to get to the bottom of
> the case - if she couldn't do it herself.
>
> The Trentadue case was catching national headlines and creating havoc
> for DOJ officials.
>
> Members of Reno's staff knew if Jordan would change his mind and rule
> the death a suicide, then the mounting pressure for hearings
>
> on Capitol Hill and the flood of news coverage about the terrible
> situation would likely go away.
>
> Responding to the mounting pressure, Dr. Jordan continued to complain
> bitterly about his treatment. He went to the Oklahoma
>
> Attorney General with his problems. Soon afterward a letter was sent
> to the civil division of the Justice Department.
>
> On March 12, 1998, Assistant Attorney General Patrick Crawley attacked
> the Justice Department attacks on Jordan and his staff.
>
> Crawley opens the letter commenting that he presumes the DOJ lawyer
> also represents the FBI and the BOP.
>
> Next Crawley launches into a vigorous assault on the US Justice
> Department's handling of the Trentadue investigation.
>
> In a sort of "Alice through the Looking Glass" set of circumstances,
> truth has been obfuscated by the agendas of various federal
>
> agencies (mostly your clients). Particularly in the initial, and most
> critical, stage of the investigation when your clients (BOP and FBI)
>
> muddled and meddled their way into the investigative operation. In the
> process, your clients prevented the medical examiner from
>
> conducting a thorough and complete investigation into the death,
> destroyed evidence, and otherwise harassed and harangued Dr.
>
> Jordan and his staff. The absurdity of this situation is that your
> clients outwardly represent law enforcement or least some arm of
> licit
>
> government.
>
> Nevertheless, even though the chances of ever establishing what really
> happened in this case have essentially vanished, the medical
>
> examiner will still look at any evidence that may be for the coming in
> an attempt to uncover the real truth in the death of Kenneth
>
> Trentadue. Whether the truth of the matter is that Kenneth Trentadue
> severely beat and bruised himself, slashed his own throat, and
>
> ultimately hung himself, which may displease the Trentadue family, or
> that he was beaten and killed by others, which may displease
>
> you and your clients, matters not to the medical examiner. The only
> item of interest in the medical examiner's investigation is the truth
>
> about what happened. It is, in the end, the task of the medical
> examiner to establish the cause and manner of his death.
>
> The real tragedy in this case appears to be the perversion of law
> through chicanery and the misuse of public trust under the guise of
>
> some aberrant for of federalism. In a succession of either illegal,
> negligent, or just plain stupid acts, your clients succeeded in
> derailing
>
> the medical examiner's investigation and, thereby, may have obstructed
> justice in this case. As more and more information is revealed
>
> in this case, primarily through the efforts of Jesse Trentadue, it
> appears that your clients, and perhaps others within the Department
> of
>
> Justice, have been abusing the powers of their respective offices. If
> this is true, all Americans should be very frightened of your clients
>
> and the DOJ. Undaunted, when you come into possession of the least
> little tidbit of misinformation you immediately conclude that my
>
> client, who has always acted honorably, has suddenly abandoned his
> principles to improperly torpedo your group.
>
> Summarizing the government's alleged interference in the ME's work,
> the letter concludes: "The investigation into the death of Kenneth
>
> Trentadue remains open. If it appears that the medical examiner is not
> particularly fond of your clients and is openly distrustful of them
>
> and the DOF, it is not any more curious than a similar posture taken
> towards other criminal defendants who appear to have some
>
> liability in a case under investigation and seek to intervene or
> otherwise control the medical examiners' investigation. I will remind
> you
>
> that, to date, any and all evidence of wrongdoing points only to your
> client or clients. This is true regardless of how Kenneth Trentadue
>
> was killed. On the primary distinguishing features o this
> investigation has been the power of possible suspects to interfere
> with the
>
> inquiry under color of law. Naturally we view any participation by
> suspects in an investigation with no small amount of alarm and
>
> distrust."
>
> Clearly the medical examiner's office was holding firm at this time.
> At least when Jesse Trentadue read the letter copied to his law
>
> office he felt satisfied that he had at least one stalwart friend
> fighting with him for truth and justice in the matter of his brother's
> revolting
>
> and mysterious death.
>
> Then, suddenly Oklahoma County District Attorney Bob Macy's office
> entered the picture.
>
> Macy and his staff came to the case on the guise they would conduct an
> independent investigation into the death of Kenneth
>
> Trentadue at the Federal Transfer Center.
>
> The Patrick Ryan, the U.S. attorney charged with prosecuting the
> OKBOMB case stepped encouraged Macy's intervention. The stated
>
> rationale was that everyone seemed to have lost confidence in the
> FBI's and BOP's handling of the matter.
>
> In very little time after Macy's staff entered the case and began
> visiting with the medical examiner, Dr. Jordan suddenly changed
>
> Trentadue's cause of death from unknown to suicide.
>
> Shocked by the sudden turnaround, Jesse Trentadue immediately began
> researching who was behind getting Jordan to change his
>
> findings to suicide. Trentadue was told the man was a former Oklahoma
> City police detective named Tom Bevel.
>
> Retained by District Attorney Bob Macy and assisted by Richard
> Wintory, a prosecutor working in Macy's office, Tom Bevel was a
>
> very well known local crime scene reconstruction expert.
>
> Trentadue explained Bevels unusual relationship to the various parties
> involved in the wide-ranging investigations and a wrongful death
>
> civil suit, "The expert witness hired to help defend the government
> against my family's civil suit, Tom Bevel was also being paid by the
>
> government to help write the OIG's report of its official
> investigation into the circumstances of my brother's death.
>
> "More incredible still, Bevel was being paid by the government at the
> same time he was part of the Macy/Wintory investigation!"
>
> Thus, all the investigations were linked through one individual. A
> crime scene investigator brought in by Bob Macy.
>
> Tom Bevel would not only be charged with investigating the FBI, but he
> also was working for the Justice Department's Inspector
>
> General charged with investigating the FBI and Department of Justice's
> handling of the case. Additionally Mr. Bevel was collecting
>
> money from the Department of Justice to help them defend themselves
> against the Trentadue's family's wrongful death civil suit.
>
> Jesse Trentadue is bitter about what his family has experienced: "The
> sick thing about the entire situation was the epidemic of
>
> government corruption we dug up. Perjury, subornation of perjury,
> threats to witnesses, destruction of evidence, fabrication of
> evidence
>
> and a _ _ _ _ pile of other acts of obstruction of justice! The
> government obtained an order preventing me from reporting those
> crimes
>
> to either federal prosecutors or the Senate Judiciary Committee while
> at the same time it was trying to indict me and my attorneys
>
> with the perjured testimony of a secret FBI informant. Every
> investigation was a sham."
>
> And there would be much more evidence Trentadue would discover in his
> quest for justice. Evidence that he feels reveals one of the
>
> most carefully contrived cover-ups involving the Department of Justice
> in modern history.
>
> http://www.infowars.com/articles/us/kenneth_michael_trentadue_04.htm
>
> In the matter of Kenneth Michael Trentadue (Part 5/5)
>
> J.D. Cash / McCurtain Dailey Gazette | April 7, 2004
>
> Oklahoma's chief medical examiner, issued a final amendment to his
> autopsy report on Kenneth Michael Trentadue, an inmate whose
>
> bloody and heavily bruised body had been found in a cell at Oklahoma
> City's Federal Transfer Center in August of 1995.
>
> The medical examiner's surprising report would dramatically affect
> several ongoing criminal investigations and a multi-million dollar
> civil
>
> lawsuit brought by the inmate's family against the government.
>
> Suddenly, after nearly three years of publicly stating doubts that
> Trentadue had killed himself at the federal facility, Jordan reversed
>
> that position and found that the inmate had indeed committed suicide
> after all.
>
> Many wonder today if someone was finally able to successfully pressure
> Jordan to ignore evidence of the inmate's torture and murder
>
> in order to arrive at the conclusion that Trentadue had killed
> himself.
>
> Trentadue's mysterious death occurred shortly after his arrest on the
> Mexican border, south of San Diego, Ca. - only a few weeks
>
> following the Oklahoma City bombing.
>
> According to the arrest report, a border guard thought Trentadue might
> have been drunk when he tried to enter the U.S. A check for
>
> warrants turned up one. It was for failure to report to a parole
> officer. Trentadue was a fugitive; albeit for a minor infraction.
>
> While processing the arrest records, authorities noted Trentadue's
> general physical description, including a very unusual dragon tattoo
>
> on his left arm. The entire description was a good match for the
> elusive John Doe 2, a subject the government had been searching for
>
> in connection to the Oklahoma City bombing for several weeks.
>
> Not long after turning in the arrest report, a team of U.S. marshals
> arrived to pick up the prisoner. Days later, Trentadue arrived at the
>
> Oklahoma City FTC for a parole hearing.
>
> Within 24 hours of his arrival at the Federal Transfer Center,
> Trentadue became agitated, federal agents claimed. He also commented
>
> to guards that he was the subject of some kind of misidentification
> and might be in trouble for something he had not done.
>
> A Bureau of Prison (BOP) report notes: "I must have got stepped into
> some real _ _ _ _ somewhere."
>
> Records from the prison also indicate that Trentadue requested that he
> be taken out of the general population in the prison and placed
>
> in a unit reserved for inmates requiring special protection. His
> family doubts he made such a request, though.
>
> Brother Jesse Trentadue commented: "We spoke to Kenny during this time
> frame, and he was very upbeat and said nothing about any
>
> danger he might be in or wanting to be taken to solitary. I believe he
> was surprised when he was taken to the Special Housing Unit
>
> (SHU)."
>
> Hours after records indicate Trentadue was taken to the SHU, he was
> found hanging from strips of a bed sheet - bloody, severely
>
> bruised, his throat slashed and dead.
>
> Despite the condition of his body suggesting that he had been severely
> beaten, Bureau of Prison transfer center workers and member
>
> of the Oklahoma City FBI ruled the death a suicide.
>
> Federal workers at the transfer center told investigators that the
> inmate appeared to be asleep when his cell was checked at 2:38 a.m.
>
> on the morning of Aug. 21, 1995. When a guard made his next rounds at
> 3 a.m., the BOP worker reported Trentadue was hanging by
>
> a bed sheet and there was considerable blood visible on the body and
> in the cell.
>
> When two employees from the state medical examiner's office arrived to
> conduct an investigation, they were told they could not
>
> examine the cell. Supervisors at the facility said they would do their
> own investigation.
>
> Turning away the medical examiners from the scene was a clear
> violation of state law - one of many abuses of authority the
>
> remarkable case would experience. Subsequent investigations would
> uncover several cases of perjury and the destruction or loss of 41
>
> critical pieces of evidence.
>
> For the next three years, Oklahoma's medical examiner kept the
> investigation open - refusing to bow to pressure from the FBI and
>
> BOP to call the inmate's death on federal property a suicide.
>
> Trentadue's severely cut and heavily bruised body had convinced Dr.
> Jordan and his staff that the individual had been severely beaten
>
> before death.
>
> Since the BOP said Trentadue was in the SHU without access to other
> prisoners, naturally the guards at the institution were the
>
> primary suspects. And those guards immediately cleaned the cell and
> kept the medical examiner's office from doing its own
>
> investigation of the scene.
>
> Many around the nation believed this was a classic government crime
> and cover-up. Embarrassing headlines sizzled with innuendos of
>
> government misdeeds in the inmate's death.
>
> Intense lobbying by the victim's brother, Jesse Trentadue, resulted in
> a whole host of investigations being launched, including a federal
>
> grand jury review of the case; a FBI investigation, a number of
> inquiries from congressmen; an investigation by Oklahoma District
>
> Attorney Bob Macy; and an investigation by the Inspector General for
> the Department of Justice in Washington D.C.
>
> At the center of the whirlwind was one man, the Oklahoma Medical
> Examiner, Dr. Fred Jordan.
>
> For nearly two years, Jordan refused to declare Trentadue's death
> suicide. In fact, Jordan on more than one occasion publicly stated
>
> the inmate was probably killed by members of the federal government
> who destroyed the evidence, thus he was unable to prove that a
>
> murder had taken place.
>
> Flip-flop
>
> After three years of complaining about pressure he was receiving to
> declare Trentatue's injuries self-inflicted, in July of 1998, Jordan
> did
>
> just that and amended the manner of the inmate's mysterious death from
> "unknown" to "suicide." Persons close to the case were
>
> shocked.
>
> Jordan said he was able to reach the conclusion on to the manner of
> death after receiving new evidence from the Oklahoma City Police
>
> Department. Jordan's new evidence consisted of what he called evidence
> of a suicide note the BOP and FBI said they found written on
>
> a wall in the prisoner's cell. The note, Jordan said, contained the
> words, "My minds no longer it's friend. Love Ya, Familia."
>
> Also, the medical examiner concluded that inmate Trentadue "had
> experienced very stressful events (being in prison) and facing
>
> significant losses (a possible prison sentence if his parole was
> revoked) just before death."
>
> Jordan concluded his press statement, saying he regretted that
> "previous investigative problems" prevented an earlier resolution of
> the
>
> Trentadue case.
>
> Responding to Jordan's assertions that Trentadue had experienced very
> stressful events and faced a long stint in prison for violating his
>
> parole agreement, his brother Jesse told this newspaper, "We obtained
> actual copies of taped phone calls and transcripts of phone
>
> calls between the family and Kenney. At no time while Kenney was
> talking to us from the OKC/FTC did he exhibit anything to indicate
>
> he was worried about anything.
>
> "We all knew he might be in jail a few weeks and that would be it. The
> government has absolutely no proof of a change in his feelings
>
> and they have those same tapes and transcripts.
>
> "And that so-called suicide note is nowhere to be seen now. It was
> painted over by the feds. They say they took a picture of it before
>
> painting over it. It was supposed to have been signed by someone name
> Paul. After Kenney was killed, they came up with a photo
>
> they said was of some writing on the wall of Kenney's cell. Later when
> they found out my brother's name was Kenneth they decided
>
> the writing was signed Familia and not Paul.
>
> "The feds never could find a handwriting analyst that would positively
> say the writing was my brother's. One expert said he couldn't rule
>
> it out and that apparently was all Jordan needed at that point."
>
> Jordan also pointed to assistance he received from retired Oklahoma
> City police detective Tom Bevel in persuading him Trentadue had
>
> inflicted the approximately two-dozen cuts and bruises visible on the
> body, before the inmate cut his throat and hanged himself.
>
> A homicide detective, Bevel was part of special investigation headed
> by Oklahoma District Attorney Bob Macy's office. Macy had been
>
> asked to conduct an independent investigation into the suspicious
> death after public confidence in the FBI and the BOP was
>
> diminished by so many charges that crucial evidence in the case had
> been mishandled, lost, and even destroyed by those agencies.
>
> Eventually the Trentadue family learned that Bevel was not only
> working for the Macy investigation team, but had also received
>
> payments for his services in the case from Department of Justice and
> the DOJ's oversight agency, the Office of Inspector General.
>
> Upon learning of this, the family also learned that a forensic
> document investigator from Macy's team, J. Michael Hull, had also
> agreed
>
> to serve as an expert to the DOJ, the very agency Jesse Trentadue and
> his family were suing for the wrongful death of their loved one.
>
> Incensed, Trentadue wrote Macy a letter on Feb. 28, 2000, raising the
> issue of conflict of interest. Included in the scolding
>
> correspondence, Trentadue made the following charges and observations:
>
> "I am writing to complain about the conduct of two of the officers who
> assisted your Task Force in the investigation into the
>
> circumstances of my brother's death. The individuals about whom I wish
> to complain are Tom Bevel and J. Michael Hull. My complaint
>
> concerns the fact that these individuals have agreed to serve as paid
> expert witnesses for the targets of that investigation, in violation
>
> of the common law, the Oklahoma Political Subdivisions Ethics Act and
> your trust.
>
> "While employed by the Oklahoma City Police Department, Bevel was
> assigned to assist the FBI in its initial investigation into the
>
> circumstances of my brother's death. Hull while employed as a forensic
> documents examiner at the Oklahoma City police department,
>
> likewise was part of your Task Force. As you know, the targets of that
> investigation were the Department of Justice and their
>
> personnel.
>
> "On Aug. 5, 1998, (when the ink on your Task Force's Final Report was
> still wet) we discovered that both Bevel and Hull have agreed
>
> to serve as highly paid expert witnesses for the Department of Justice
> and other defendants in my family's civil lawsuit who happen to
>
> the be the same targets of your investigation.
>
> "As part of your Task Force, Bevel and Hull had access to confidential
> information including Grand Jury materials not available to me
>
> or my attorneys. They are now willing to sell this information to the
> highest bidder, which happens to be the targets of their
>
> investigation. ..... Bevel and Hull's conduct in this matter is
> analogous to that of a prosecutor or county attorney investigating
>
> organized crime who resigns his or her position with the government
> and goes to work for the mobsters who were the target of the
>
> investigation. This is not permissible because the former government
> employee takes with him or her confidential and other information
>
> acquired in his or her role as a public official. .... How, for
> example, can you contend that your investigation into the
> circumstances of
>
> my brother's death was thorough, fair and objective when two of the
> key investigators have sold out to the targets of that investigation?"
>
> Macy responded to Trentadue's charges in a letter dated March 13,
> 2000.
>
> "The simple fact is that both Bevel and Hull during their tenure with
> the Oklahoma City Police Department assisted our office in an
>
> impartial and neutral way and rendered their opinions based on
> physical evidence gathered from the scene and during the
>
> investigation. Those results are reflected in our report concluding
> that your brother tragically committed suicide. ... After both men
>
> retired from the Oklahoma City Police Department and completed their
> work in this investigation they were available to either party.
>
> Not surprisingly, because their findings and the evidence on the case
> are fundamentally inconsistent with your lawsuit, the government
>
> chose to call them as witnesses. The only question remaining is this:
> now that neither are being paid for their time by the Oklahoma
>
> City Police Department and indeed are employed providing expert
> consulting service to the litigants whether they should volunteer
> their
>
> time and expertise to the government or charge their standard fees."
>
> Documents provided this newspaper show that Tom Bevel collected $125
> per hour for his work in the case. J. Michael Hull's fees came
>
> to $120 per hour, plus travel expenses.
>
> During testimony in the Trentadue family's wrongful death lawsuit
> against the Department of Justice, Tom Bevel took the stand and
>
> admitted his many roles and employers in the wide-ranging
> investigation.
>
> After acknowledging he retired from the Oklahoma City Police
> Department in May 1996, Bevel said he was contacted by the Macy's
>
> Oklahoma County Task Force charged with investigating Trentadue's
> death. Once his final report was completed, Bevel said,
>
> "Sometime later (I) was asked to look at the case by the U.S. Office
> of Inspector General and then ultimately the U.S. Justice
>
> Department retained me."
>
> Asked what he did for the DOJ and OIG, Bevel said, "To do an analysis
> of the cell primarily to identify the most probable sequence of
>
> events that would have taken place.... Whether or not there was any
> evidence of additional people involved in the activities, was there
>
> anything that would be consistent with homicide. I did not."
>
> Family sickened by treatment
>
> Jesse Trentadue is still very disturbed about his treatment by Macy's
> former investigators on the task force established to investigate
>
> his brother's death.
>
> "We trusted Bob Macy and his people. We put all our faith and trust in
> them. The record shows they took information about our case
>
> against the DOJ, then they went to work for the other side," Trentadue
> said.
>
> Before going over to work for the DOJ and OIG, Tom Bevel wrote a
> report for the Macy task force that would later serve as a framework
>
> the government could use to excuse employees of the ...
>
> read more
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